Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Dangers of Fighting in Afghanistan

My friend at wmtc posted this morning about the "sacrifice medal" which is being awarded to Canadian soldiers who are killed in Afghanistan. In the news is a Regina man who was told his son would not be awarded the medal, because he was accidentally killed by a fellow soldier. Apparently, the medal only goes to soldiers killed or wounded as a direct result of hostile action. Although I don't think our troops are helping the overall situation and should be withdrawn, I do think the majority of our soldiers had good intentions and wanted to honour their country; I think if medals are to be given out, the cause of death should not matter.

But there is a more significant fact to come out of this story: of almost 100 Canadian soldiers who have died, 13 will not be getting the medal. That's 13. Does that figure not bother anyone? Hey, Canadians! If you get deployed to Afghanistan and end up getting killed, the chance of it happening by accident are greater than 10%! "Sorry, buddy. Didn't mean to shoot you. Buddy?"

To hell with "red Fridays", yellow ribbon car magnets, and all of Harper's other propaganda. Afghanistan is worse off than before they were invaded. Occupation forces are not wanted by the Afghanis. Almost 100 Canadians are dead, and our forces hold the dubious distinction of having the highest death rate of the occupying forces.

Support our soldiers; bring them home. Right now.

6 comments:

Geekwad said...

Since you are critical of 10%, there must be some value that's better. What's the correct ratio? If a soldier dies back home (It's dangerous work, even when you're not at war!) the odds of it being an accident are nearly 100%. They're not going to stop accidentally dying when we put them in an even more dangerous environment...

Kim_in_TO said...

You've missed the point - which is that they shouldn't be there at all. They are freeing up American troops to be in Iraq, which means they are part of the illegal, immoral invasion, and the fight for oil, not to mention the politcal attempt by Harper to be Bush's lapdog. Every single one of those deaths was unnecessary. The fact that so many are dying by accident just makes the whole debacle that much more tragic.

wrath of khan said...

I have some friends in the Canadian Military. I was told very candidly by them that the reason Canada is in Afghanistan is because they did not want to go to Iraq- because of public opinion and because the Liberal Party would have found it too difficult to justify. There is no doubt in anyone's mind that Canada is doing the USA's dirty work. The question is, how long will the lie hold up with the Canadian public? What will it take for them to demand an end to Canadian war adventures. Any fool can see that Canada is not under attack so why is it in Afghanistan?
I wonder what number war supporters attach to the casualties before they will change their minds about the war? I also wonder if we know how many soldiers have been maimed and seriously injured by the war? How many are mentally disturbed by it? How many are psychologically tortured? Those numbers never make the headlines now do they?

Kim_in_TO said...

No, and it's clear that as with Americans returning from Iraq, many Canadians will suffer PTSD for many years, or possibly for life. They will be lucky if their trauma is recognized and treated. This has been an ongoing issue because mental/emotional trauma is not visible, so the authorities can deny or ignore it.

L-girl said...

I have some friends in the Canadian Military. I was told very candidly by them that the reason Canada is in Afghanistan is because they did not want to go to Iraq- because of public opinion and because the Liberal Party would have found it too difficult to justify.

That's it in a nutshell. It's Canada being more eager to please the US than to respect the will of its own citizens. And this one can't just be conveniently pinned on the Conservatives.

L-girl said...

Since you are critical of 10%

The post is not critical of 10% or any percent of the soldiers. It's critical of the policy that put the soldiers there, needlessly risking their lives for nothing.